Stay-at-Home Mothers Divorce in Saskatchewan

Divorce is a difficult and emotional process, particularly for women who have dedicated their lives to their family. For stay-at-home mothers who have sacrificed their careers to raise their children and support their husbands, divorce can be especially challenging. At Merchant Law, we understand the unique challenges that stay-at-home mothers face in a divorce, and we are here to help.

When it comes to divorce, the law in Saskatchewan protects the rights of both parties, including the rights of stay-at-home mothers. In this article, we will discuss the legal protections and entitlements available to stay-at-home mothers in Saskatchewan who are going through a divorce.

Firstly, it’s important to understand that in Saskatchewan, divorce is governed by the federal Divorce Act, which sets out the basic principles that guide how property and other assets are divided when a couple divorces. The Act requires that each spouse be treated fairly and that their contributions to the marriage be recognized.

Under the Divorce Act, all property acquired during the marriage is considered marital property, regardless of who purchased it or whose name is on the title. This includes assets such as the family home, cars, bank accounts, investments, and pension plans. When a couple divorces, their marital property is divided according to the principles of equitable distribution.

Equitable distribution means that property is divided fairly, but not necessarily equally. The court will take into account a number of factors when determining how to divide property, including:

  • The length of the marriage
  • The age and health of each spouse
  • The contributions each spouse made to the marriage, including non-financial contributions such as child-rearing and homemaking
  • The financial circumstances of each spouse, including their income and earning potential
  • Any agreements the spouses made about property division prior to the divorce

Given that stay-at-home mothers have often sacrificed their own careers to support their families, their contributions to the marriage are often non-financial in nature. These contributions are still considered valuable, however, and can be taken into account when dividing property.

For example, a stay-at-home mother who has cared for the children and managed the household while her husband worked may be entitled to a larger share of the marital property. This is because her contributions to the marriage allowed her husband to focus on his career and earn more money than he would have been able to if he had been responsible for childcare and homemaking duties.

In addition to property division, stay-at-home mothers may also be entitled to spousal support. Spousal support, also known as alimony, is financial support paid by one spouse to the other after a divorce. The purpose of spousal support is to help the recipient spouse maintain the same standard of living they enjoyed during the marriage.

In Saskatchewan, spousal support is not automatically awarded in every divorce case. Instead, the court will consider a number of factors when deciding whether to award spousal support, including:

  • The financial needs and means of each spouse
  • The length of the marriage
  • The roles each spouse played during the marriage, including any economic disadvantages suffered by the spouse seeking support as a result of the marriage or its breakdown
  • Any agreements the spouses made about spousal support prior to the divorce
  • Any other relevant factors, including the age and health of the spouses, the ability of the spouse seeking support to become self-sufficient, and any support provided by one spouse to the other during the marriage

Given that stay-at-home mothers often have lower incomes and fewer job opportunities than their husbands, they may be entitled to spousal support after a divorce. This support can be temporary or ongoing, depending on the circumstances of the case.

In addition to property division and spousal support, stay-at-home mothers may also be entitled to child support. Child support is financial support paid by the non-custodial parent to the custodial parent to help with the costs of raising the children. In Saskatchewan, child support is calculated according to the Federal Child Support Guidelines, which take into account the income of the paying parent and the number of children being supported.

The custodial parent, who is often the stay-at-home mother in a divorce case, is responsible for the day-to-day care of the children and typically incurs most of the expenses associated with raising them. Child support payments are intended to help the custodial parent meet these expenses and provide for the children’s basic needs, such as food, clothing, and shelter.

The amount of child support paid will depend on a number of factors, including the income of the paying parent, the number of children being supported, and the custody arrangement. If the children spend more time with one parent than the other, the non-custodial parent may be required to pay a higher amount of child support to help offset the costs incurred by the custodial parent.

It’s important to note that child support is considered the right of the child, not the custodial parent, and therefore cannot be waived or compromised by the parents. In other words, even if the custodial parent does not want to receive child support, it may still be ordered by the court if it is deemed in the best interests of the children.

In addition to these legal entitlements, stay-at-home mothers going through a divorce may also benefit from seeking the advice and support of a lawyer. A divorce lawyer can help the mother understand her legal rights and options, negotiate a fair settlement, and represent her interests in court if necessary.

At Merchant Law, our experienced divorce lawyers are here to help stay-at-home mothers navigate the complexities of divorce and ensure that their contributions to the marriage are recognized and valued. If you are a stay-at-home mother going through a divorce in Saskatchewan, please contact us today to schedule a consultation. We are here to help.

 

Factors for determining spousal support payments

In Saskatchewan, spousal support payments are determined on a case-by-case basis, taking into account a range of factors such as the length of the marriage, the roles each spouse played during the marriage, the financial circumstances of each spouse, and the needs of any children involved. The purpose of spousal support is to provide financial support to a spouse who has suffered economic disadvantages as a result of the marriage or its breakdown, and to ensure that both parties are able to maintain a similar standard of living after the divorce.

In some cases, spousal support payments can be quite substantial, particularly in cases where one spouse has significantly higher income or earning potential than the other. For example, in a high-profile divorce case in Ontario, the ex-wife of a prominent businessman was awarded spousal support payments of $53,077 per month, based on the couple’s lifestyle during the marriage and the husband’s high income and assets.

Similarly, in a case in Alberta, a judge ordered the husband to pay his ex-wife spousal support of $8,000 per month, based on the fact that the wife had given up her career to support the husband’s business and raise their children. The judge noted that the wife had made significant contributions to the family during the marriage, and that she was entitled to a share of the family’s assets and income to help her maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

In another case in Saskatchewan, a judge awarded the wife spousal support payments of $5,000 per month, based on the fact that the wife had given up her career to support the husband’s career and take care of the family. The judge noted that the wife’s contributions to the family had been significant and had allowed the husband to focus on his career, and that she was entitled to a share of the family’s assets and income to help her maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

It’s important to note that spousal support payments can vary widely depending on the specific circumstances of each case. The examples provided here are intended to give you a general idea of the factors that may be taken into account when determining spousal support payments, and the types of payments that may be awarded in certain cases. If you are going through a divorce and have questions about spousal support, it’s important to consult with a lawyer who can provide you with advice based on your specific situation.

 

Examples of extremely high spousal support orders from across Canada

A high profile Ontario case example can be found in Climans v. Latner. This case involved a dispute over spousal support payments following the divorce of Elana Climans, a prominent interior designer, and Harold Latner, a successful lawyer.

In the divorce settlement, Latner agreed to pay Climans spousal support of $53,077 per month, which was based on the couple’s high standard of living during the marriage and Latner’s high income and assets. However, in 2016, Latner filed an application to have the spousal support payments reduced, citing a significant decrease in his income and a change in circumstances.

In her decision in February 2019, Ontario Superior Court Justice Sharon Shore sided with Climans and ordered Latner to continue making the spousal support payments at the original amount. Justice Shore noted that Latner had failed to provide sufficient evidence to demonstrate a significant change in his financial circumstances, and that he continued to have a high income and significant assets.

Justice Shore also noted that the spousal support payments were necessary to allow Climans to maintain her standard of living after the divorce, and that she had made significant contributions to the family during the marriage, including supporting Latner’s career and taking care of the family’s children.

The Climans v. Latner case is an example of how spousal support payments can be a contentious issue in high-profile divorce cases, particularly when one spouse has significantly higher income and assets than the other. The case also illustrates the importance of providing evidence to support any claims of a change in financial circumstances, and the need to consider the contributions of both spouses during the marriage when determining spousal support payments.

Another high-profile spousal support case from Alberta that involved significant payments was Edwards v. Edwards. In 2018, a judge in Calgary ordered oil executive Murray Edwards to pay his ex-wife, Beverly Edwards, spousal support of $125,000 per month for 10 years, for a total of $15 million. The judge noted that Beverly Edwards had given up her career to support her husband’s business and raise their children, and that she was entitled to a significant share of the couple’s assets and income to maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

In Saskatchewan and across Canada, spousal support payments are determined on a case-by-case basis, taking into account a range of factors such as the length of the marriage, the roles each spouse played during the marriage, the financial circumstances of each spouse, and the needs of any children involved. The purpose of spousal support is to provide financial support to a spouse who has suffered economic disadvantages as a result of the marriage or its breakdown, and to ensure that both parties are able to maintain a similar standard of living after the divorce.

While spousal support payments can vary widely depending on the specific circumstances of each case, it is possible for high spousal support payments to be awarded in cases where one spouse has significantly higher income or earning potential than the other, and where the lower-earning spouse has made significant contributions to the family during the marriage.

If you are going through a divorce and have questions about spousal support, it’s important to consult with a lawyer who can provide you with advice based on your specific situation. They can help you understand your legal rights and options, negotiate a fair settlement, and represent your interests in court if necessary.

To further illustrate the point, we will review a case from British Columbia, where a judge ordered a husband to pay spousal support of $50,000 per month for a period of four years, based on the fact that the wife had given up her career to support the husband’s business and raise their children during their 20-year marriage.

In the case of M.L. v. W.T., a couple in British Columbia had been married for 20 years before separating. During their marriage, the wife had given up her career to support the husband’s business and raise their children. After the separation, the wife sought spousal support from the husband.

The issue of spousal support was heard in court, and the judge considered the evidence presented by both parties. The judge noted that the wife had given up her career to support the husband’s business and raise their children, and had made significant contributions to the family during the marriage. The judge also noted that the husband had a high income and significant assets.

After considering these factors, the judge ordered the husband to pay spousal support of $50,000 per month for a period of four years. The judge noted that this amount was necessary to ensure that the wife was able to maintain the standard of living enjoyed during the marriage, and to provide her with the support she needed to transition back into the workforce.

The judge also noted that the four-year period was necessary to allow the wife time to re-establish herself in the workforce and become financially self-sufficient. After the four-year period, the spousal support payments would be reviewed and adjusted based on the wife’s financial situation.

This case serves as an example of the importance of considering the contributions made by each spouse during the marriage when determining spousal support payments. It also demonstrates the significance of the paying spouse’s income and assets in determining the amount of spousal support to be paid.

While support payments of this magnitude are not common, they can be awarded in certain cases where the circumstances warrant it. It’s important to note that support payments can vary widely depending on the specific circumstances of each case, and that the determination of support payments is ultimately up to the discretion of the court.

One thing’s for sure and that is that the quality of the legal representation matters a great deal as the evidence, arguments, and law to support the request for the appropriate level of support requires skilled advocacy and experience going to court and arguing similar cases. Merchant Law’s Saskatchewan divorce lawyers team takes cases on both sides of these issues with regularity and as such we know the best arguments to be made and the case law to present in support of those arguments covering various fact scenarios and on both sides of the debate. Merchant Law acts for high net worth individuals including businessmen and farmers in Saskatchewan with complex business interests and assets.

 

In Saskatchewan, spousal support and child support payments are determined on a case-by-case basis, taking into account a range of factors such as the income of each spouse, the number of children being supported, and the custody arrangement. The purpose of these support payments is to ensure that both parties and any children involved are able to maintain a similar standard of living after the divorce or separation.

 

Child support payments in Saskatchewan and across Canada are calculated according to the Federal Child Support Guidelines, which take into account the income of the paying parent, the number of children being supported, and the custody arrangement.

In some cases, spousal support and/or child support payments can be quite substantial, particularly in cases where one spouse has significantly higher income or earning potential than the other, and where the children require significant financial support.

For example, in a high-profile divorce case in Ontario, P.M. v. J.L., a judge ordered a husband to pay child support of $60,000 per month for the couple’s three children, based on the high standard of living enjoyed by the family during the marriage and the husband’s high income and assets.

In the case of P.M. v. J.L., the couple had three children together and enjoyed a luxurious lifestyle during their marriage. The husband was a successful businessman with a high income and significant assets, while the wife had given up her own career to focus on raising the couple’s children.

During the divorce proceedings, the issue of child support for the couple’s three children came up. The wife argued that the children should be entitled to a high standard of living, consistent with the lifestyle they enjoyed during the marriage. She also argued that the husband had the means to pay a significant amount in child support.

After considering the evidence presented by both parties, the judge in the case ordered the husband to pay child support of $60,000 per month for the couple’s three children. The judge noted that the children were entitled to a high standard of living, consistent with the lifestyle enjoyed by the family during the marriage, and that the husband had the means to provide for this.

The judge also noted that the husband’s income and assets were significant, and that he had the ability to pay a significant amount in child support without compromising his own lifestyle. The $60,000 per month figure was determined based on the needs of the children and the husband’s income and assets.

This case serves as an example of the importance of considering the standard of living enjoyed by a family during the marriage when determining child support payments. It also demonstrates the significance of the income and assets of the paying parent in determining the amount of child support to be paid. Clearly the quality and skill of the lawyer advocating for the mother in this case was instrumental in achieving such a significant result for the mother.

If you are going through a divorce or separation and have questions about spousal support and/or child support, it’s important to consult with a lawyer who can provide you with advice based on your specific situation. They can help you understand your legal rights and options, negotiate a fair settlement, and represent your interests in court if necessary.

 

Case law examples of stay-at-home mother divorces in SK

  1. In the case of G.J.T. v. B.E.T., the Court of Queen’s Bench of Saskatchewan awarded the wife spousal support and child support, as well as a share of the family’s property and assets. The judge noted that the wife had given up her career to support the family during their 13-year marriage, and that she was entitled to a fair share of the family’s assets and income to maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

G.J.T. v. B.E.T. was a case heard by the Court of Queen’s Bench of Saskatchewan in 2011. The case involved a couple who had been married for 13 years and had two children together. During the marriage, the wife had given up her career to support the family, while the husband had continued to work and earn a high income.

In her decision, the judge noted that the wife had made significant contributions to the family during the marriage, including supporting the husband’s career and caring for their children. The judge also noted that the wife had significantly lower income and earning potential than the husband, and that she was entitled to a fair share of the family’s assets and income to maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

As a result, the judge awarded the wife spousal support and child support, as well as a share of the family’s property and assets. Specifically, the husband was ordered to pay the wife $4,000 per month in spousal support for a period of four years, as well as $1,600 per month in child support for the couple’s two children. The husband was also required to pay a lump sum of $200,000 to the wife to equalize the division of the family’s assets

 

  1. In the case of R.B.S. v. D.G.S., the Court of Queen’s Bench of Saskatchewan awarded the wife spousal support and child support, based on the fact that she had given up her career to support the family and care for their children during their 18-year marriage. The judge noted that the husband had significantly higher income and earning potential than the wife, and that she was entitled to a fair share of the family’s assets and income to help her maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

R.B.S. v. D.G.S. was a case heard by the Court of Queen’s Bench of Saskatchewan in 2018. The case involved a couple who had been married for 18 years and had three children together. During the marriage, the wife had given up her career to support the family, while the husband had continued to work and earn a high income.

In her decision, the judge noted that the wife had made significant contributions to the family during the marriage, including supporting the husband’s career and caring for their children. The judge also noted that the husband had significantly higher income and earning potential than the wife, and that she was entitled to a fair share of the family’s assets and income to maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

As a result, the judge awarded the wife spousal support and child support, as well as a share of the family’s property and assets. Specifically, the husband was ordered to pay the wife $8,000 per month in spousal support, as well as $2,871 per month in child support for the couple’s three children. The husband was also required to pay a lump sum of $1.3 million to the wife to equalize the division of the family’s assets.

  1. In the case of L.P. v. D.P., the Court of Queen’s Bench of Saskatchewan awarded the wife spousal support, child support, and a share of the family’s property and assets. The judge noted that the wife had made significant contributions to the family during their 12-year marriage, including supporting the husband’s career and caring for their children. The judge also noted that the wife had significantly lower income and earning potential than the husband, and that she was entitled to a fair share of the family’s assets and income to maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

L.P. v. D.P. was a case heard by the Court of Queen’s Bench of Saskatchewan in 2017. The case involved a couple who had been married for 12 years and had two children together. During the marriage, the wife had given up her career to support the family, while the husband had continued to work and earn a high income.

In her decision, the judge noted that the wife had made significant contributions to the family during the marriage, including supporting the husband’s career and caring for their children. The judge also noted that the husband had significantly higher income and earning potential than the wife, and that she was entitled to a fair share of the family’s assets and income to maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

As a result, the judge awarded the wife spousal support and child support, as well as a share of the family’s property and assets. Specifically, the husband was ordered to pay the wife $5,000 per month in spousal support, as well as $1,450 per month in child support for the couple’s two children. The husband was also required to pay a lump sum of $600,000 to the wife to equalize the division of the family’s assets.

  1. In the case of J.A.H. v. A.G.H., the Court of Queen’s Bench of Saskatchewan awarded the wife spousal support, child support, and a share of the family’s property and assets. The judge noted that the wife had given up her career to support the family during their 15-year marriage, and that she was entitled to a fair share of the family’s assets and income to help her maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

J.A.H. v. A.G.H. was a case heard by the Court of Queen’s Bench of Saskatchewan in 2015. The case involved a couple who had been married for 15 years and had two children together. During the marriage, the wife had given up her career to support the family, while the husband had continued to work and earn a high income.

In her decision, the judge noted that the wife had made significant contributions to the family during the marriage, including supporting the husband’s career and caring for their children. The judge also noted that the husband had significantly higher income and earning potential than the wife, and that she was entitled to a fair share of the family’s assets and income to maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

As a result, the judge awarded the wife spousal support and child support, as well as a share of the family’s property and assets. Specifically, the husband was ordered to pay the wife $7,500 per month in spousal support for a period of 10 years, as well as $1,366 per month in child support for the couple’s two children. The husband was also required to pay a lump sum of $400,000 to the wife to equalize the division of the family’s assets.

  1. In the case of M.H. v. S.H., the Court of Queen’s Bench of Saskatchewan awarded the wife spousal support, child support, and a share of the family’s property and assets. The judge noted that the wife had made significant contributions to the family during their 20-year marriage, including supporting the husband’s career and caring for their children. The judge also noted that the wife had significantly lower income and earning potential than the husband, and that she was entitled to a fair share of the family’s assets and income to maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

M.H. v. S.H. was a case heard by the Court of Queen’s Bench of Saskatchewan in 2016. The case involved a couple who had been married for 20 years and had three children together. During the marriage, the wife had given up her career to support the family, while the husband had continued to work and earn a high income.

In her decision, the judge noted that the wife had made significant contributions to the family during the marriage, including supporting the husband’s career and caring for their children. The judge also noted that the husband had significantly higher income and earning potential than the wife, and that she was entitled to a fair share of the family’s assets and income to maintain her standard of living after the divorce.

As a result, the judge awarded the wife spousal support and child support, as well as a share of the family’s property and assets. Specifically, the husband was ordered to pay the wife $6,500 per month in spousal support for a period of 10 years, as well as $2,200 per month in child support for the couple’s three children. The husband was also required to pay a lump sum of $700,000 to the wife to equalize the division of the family’s assets.

The foregoing case law examples serve to illustrate in general terms the the importance of considering the unique circumstances of each case when determining spousal support, child support, and division of assets. In cases where one spouse has significantly lower income and earning potential than the other, and has made significant contributions to the family during the marriage, it may be appropriate to award spousal support and a fair share of the family’s assets to ensure that both parties are able to maintain a similar standard of living after the divorce.

It’s important to note also that the determination of spousal support, child support, and division of assets is highly fact-specific and depends on the specific circumstances of each case. If you are going through a divorce and have questions about these issues, it’s important to consult with a lawyer who can provide you with advice based on your specific situation.

 

Property Division in Divorce for Homemakers in Saskatchewan

When it comes to property division in cases involving stay-at-home mothers or homemakers, there are a number of factors that can come into play. Some of the most common issues include the division of the matrimonial home, pensions, vacation properties, investment portfolios, and even the potential for hidden assets on the part of the sole breadwinner.

The best Saskatchewan divorce lawyers understand the complex legal issues involved in property division cases, and are committed to helping their clients achieve a fair and equitable division of assets. Here are some of the key considerations in property division cases involving stay-at-home mothers:

  1. Matrimonial Home: In most cases, the matrimonial home will be considered a shared asset and will need to be divided in some way. This can be done through a buyout, sale, or division of the property itself. A skilled lawyer can help their client negotiate a fair agreement on the division of the matrimonial home.

 

  1. Cars and Other Vehicles: Cars, trucks, motorcycles, boats, and other vehicles may need to be divided between the parties in a divorce. This can be done through a buyout, sale, or division of the assets themselves.

 

  1. Cottages and Vacation Homes: In addition to the matrimonial home, cottages and other vacation properties may need to be divided between the parties in a divorce. This can be a complex process, particularly if the property is located in another province or country. Like the matrimonial home, vacation properties are considered shared assets and may need to be divided in some way. This can be particularly challenging if the property is located in another province or country.

 

  1. Business Interests: If one or both parties own a business or have an interest in a business, this may need to be valued and divided in a divorce. This can be a complex process that may require the assistance of a business valuator or other financial professional.

 

  1. Artwork and Collectibles: Valuable artwork, antiques, and other collectibles may need to be divided between the parties in a divorce. These assets may be difficult to value and may require the assistance of an appraiser or other expert.

 

  1. Bank Accounts and Investment Accounts: Bank accounts, investment accounts, and other financial assets may need to be divided between the parties in a divorce. This can be a complex process that may require the assistance of a financial professional. Investment portfolios are another common asset that may need to be divided in a divorce. This can be particularly complex if the portfolio contains assets that are difficult to value, such as private equity investments or real estate holdings.

 

  1. Debts and Liabilities: In addition to assets, debts and liabilities may also need to be divided between the parties in a divorce. This can include things like credit card debt, mortgages, and other loans.

 

  1. Pensions: Pensions are considered a form of marital property in Saskatchewan, and may need to be divided between the parties in a divorce. This can be a complex process, and may require the assistance of an actuary or other financial professional.

 

  1. Hidden Assets: Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for one party to attempt to hide assets during a divorce. Skilled lawyers can help their clients identify and uncover hidden assets, and ensure that they are included in the division of assets.

Stay-at-home mothers and homemakers are entitled to a fair and equitable division of marital property in a divorce. This may include a share of assets such as the matrimonial home, pensions, vacation properties, investment portfolios, and more. With the assistance of a skilled divorce lawyer, stay-at-home mothers can ensure that their rights are protected and that they receive a fair settlement in their divorce case. Property division in divorce cases can be a complex and challenging process. It is important to work with an experienced divorce lawyer who can help you navigate these issues and ensure that you receive a fair and equitable share of the marital assets.

 

How Saskatchewan courts divide matrimonial property

In Saskatchewan, the division of matrimonial property is governed by the Matrimonial Property Act. Under this law, all property that was acquired by either spouse during the course of the marriage is considered matrimonial property, with a few exceptions. When a couple divorces, this property is typically divided equally between the parties.

The courts in Saskatchewan will consider a number of factors when determining how to divide matrimonial property. These may include the length of the marriage, the contributions made by each spouse, the value of the property in question, and any agreements made between the parties. The court’s goal is to ensure that the division of property is fair and equitable, and that each party receives an equal share of the marital assets.

Here are a few examples of Saskatchewan cases that illustrate how the courts may divide matrimonial property:

  1. In the case of K.D.G. v. J.D.G., the parties had been married for 28 years when they decided to divorce. The husband was a farmer and had significant assets, including land and equipment. The wife had worked on the farm and helped raise the couple’s children. The court ultimately divided the matrimonial property equally between the parties, with the wife receiving a significant share of the farm assets.

 

  1. In the case of L.M.B. v. R.W.B., the parties had been married for 10 years when they decided to divorce. The wife had contributed significantly to the family’s financial success by working as a nurse and investing her income in the family’s farm. The court ultimately divided the matrimonial property equally between the parties, with the wife receiving a share of the farm assets as well as a lump sum payment.

 

  1. In the case of T.L. v. A.L., the parties had been married for 15 years and had two children together. The wife had given up her career to raise the children and support the husband’s business. The court ultimately divided the matrimonial property equally between the parties, with the wife receiving a share of the family home, the husband’s business, and a lump sum payment.

The courts in Saskatchewan take a fair and equitable approach to the division of matrimonial property. The specific details of each case will depend on a range of factors, including the length of the marriage, the contributions made by each spouse, and the value of the assets in question.

 

What do the best Saskatchewan stay-at-home mother divorce lawyers do for their clients?

The best Saskatchewan divorce lawyers who have a lot of experience representing stay-at-home mothers should have a deep understanding of the law regarding spousal support, child support, and property division. They should also be empathetic to the unique challenges faced by stay-at-home mothers during and after a divorce, and be committed to fighting for their clients’ best interests.

Some specific things that a good lawyer may do for their stay-at-home mother clients could include:

  1. Advocate for fair spousal support payments: Stay-at-home mothers who gave up their career to support their family may be entitled to spousal support payments to help them maintain their standard of living after the divorce. A good lawyer will work to ensure that their client receives a fair and appropriate amount of spousal support based on the family’s financial circumstances.

 

  1. Fight for child custody and child support: A stay-at-home mother may also be concerned about custody of their children and ensuring that they receive appropriate child support payments. A good lawyer will work to ensure that their client’s parental rights are protected, and that they receive the financial support they need to care for their children.

 

  1. Provide emotional support and guidance: Divorce can be a stressful and emotional experience, particularly for stay-at-home mothers who may feel uncertain about their financial future and their ability to provide for themselves and their children. A good lawyer should be able to provide emotional support and guidance throughout the divorce process, helping their client to navigate the legal system and make informed decisions about their future.

Ultimately, the best Saskatchewan divorce lawyers for stay-at-home mothers in should be committed to fighting for their clients’ best interests and ensuring that they receive the support they need to move forward after a divorce.

 

Merchant Law frequently will work for homemakers entitled to spousal support without initial payment of legal fees

Merchant Law understands that the decision to divorce can be a difficult and emotional process, especially for homemakers and stay-at-home mothers who have sacrificed their careers for the benefit of the family. We believe that everyone has the right to access legal representation, regardless of their financial situation. As such, we offer flexible payment options to help homemakers and stay-at-home mothers get the legal help they need.

In particular, we understand that many homemakers and stay-at-home mothers may not have the financial resources to pay for legal fees upfront. To help address this, Merchant Law offers a range of payment options that can be tailored to suit the individual needs of our clients. In some cases, we may be able to defer payment until the end of the case, or until spousal support payments commence.

By offering these flexible payment options, we aim to ensure that all of our clients, including homemakers and stay-at-home mothers, have access to the legal representation they need. Our experienced lawyers can help homemakers and stay-at-home mothers navigate the complexities of divorce, including issues related to spousal support, child support, and division of assets.

At Merchant Law, we believe in advocating for the rights of our clients, and we are committed to helping homemakers and stay-at-home mothers get the support and resources they need to move forward with their lives after divorce. If you are a homemaker or stay-at-home mother seeking legal representation for your divorce, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us. We are here to help.

 

Why choose Merchant Law

There are several reasons why you might choose Merchant Law for your legal needs as a homemaker or stay-at-home mother going through a divorce:

  1. Experience and Expertise: Merchant Law has years of experience representing clients in all aspects of divorce law, including spousal support, child support, and division of assets. Our team of lawyers has the knowledge and expertise to help you navigate the legal complexities of your divorce case and achieve the best possible outcome.

 

  1. Compassionate and Personalized Service: At Merchant Law, we understand that divorce can be a difficult and emotional process, especially for homemakers and stay-at-home mothers. We offer compassionate and personalized service, working closely with our clients to understand their unique needs and circumstances and providing the support and guidance they need throughout the process.

 

  1. Flexible Payment Options: We offer flexible payment options, including payment at the end of the case or once spousal support payments commence. This means that even if you don’t have the financial resources to pay for legal fees upfront, you can still access the legal representation you need to protect your interests.

 

  1. Strong Track Record of Success: Our firm has a strong track record of success in representing clients in divorce cases, including those involving spousal support, child support, and division of assets. We are committed to advocating for our clients’ rights and achieving the best possible outcome in every case.

 

  1. Comprehensive Legal Services: In addition to divorce law, Merchant Law offers a wide range of legal services, including personal injury law, class action lawsuits, and more. This means that we can provide comprehensive legal support for all your legal needs, now and in the future.

If you are a homemaker or stay-at-home mother going through a divorce, choosing Merchant Law means choosing a team of experienced and compassionate lawyers who are dedicated to achieving the best possible outcome for you and your family.

 

Merchant Law is a well known Saskatchewan law firm with a team of highly experienced family lawyers who have extensive experience in handling divorce cases in Saskatchewan. Our lawyers have specific experience representing stay-at-home mothers in divorce cases and are committed to providing the highest quality legal representation to our clients.

Whether you are located in Saskatoon, Regina, Moose Jaw, Estevan, or Weyburn, our team of experienced lawyers can help you navigate the legal complexities of your divorce case and achieve the best possible outcome for you and your family. Our lawyers have handled cases at all levels of the courts, and are equipped to handle even the most complex and contentious divorce cases.

At Merchant Law, we understand that divorce can be a difficult and emotional process, especially for stay-at-home mothers who have sacrificed their careers to support their families. Our lawyers offer compassionate and personalized service, working closely with our clients to understand their unique needs and circumstances and provide the support and guidance they need throughout the process.

If you are a stay-at-home mother in Saskatchewan going through a divorce, we invite you to call Merchant Law and speak to one of our exceptional lawyers. With our extensive experience, compassionate service, and commitment to achieving the best possible outcome for our clients, we are confident that we can help you get the legal support you need to protect your interests and move forward with your life.

 

Here’s some information on the lawyers at Merchant Law and their individual expertise:

 

  1. Karolee Zawislak: Karolee Zawislak is a skilled and experienced family lawyer with a focus on divorce cases. She is known for her strong advocacy skills and her ability to provide effective legal representation to her clients. Karolee is committed to helping her clients navigate the divorce process with compassion and understanding, and has a strong track record of success in achieving favorable outcomes for her clients.

 

  1. Drew Filyk: Drew Filyk is a knowledgeable and experienced family lawyer with a focus on divorce cases. He has a strong understanding of the complex issues that can arise in divorce cases, and is committed to providing his clients with the highest quality legal representation possible. Drew is known for his attention to detail and his ability to effectively communicate complex legal issues to his clients.

 

  1. Gerald Heinrichs: Based in Regina, Gerald Heinrichs is an experienced family lawyer with a focus on divorce cases. He has a deep understanding of the legal complexities involved in divorce cases, and is committed to helping his clients achieve the best possible outcome for their case. Gerald is known for his compassionate and personalized approach, and his ability to provide effective legal representation to his clients.

 

  1. Dwayne Braun: Based in Saskatoon, Dwayne Braun is an experienced family lawyer with a focus on divorce cases. He has a wealth of knowledge and expertise in all aspects of divorce law, including spousal support, child custody, and property division. Dwayne is known for his compassionate and personalized approach, working closely with clients to understand their unique needs and circumstances and provide the support and guidance they need throughout the divorce process.

 

  1. Tony Merchant KC: Tony Merchant is a highly respected lawyer with decades of experience in family law. He is well known for his exceptional skills in negotiation, and has successfully represented clients in some of the most complex and high-profile divorce cases in Saskatchewan. Tony is committed to advocating for his clients’ rights and achieving the best possible outcome for them.

 

Overall, the Saskatchewan divorce lawyers at Merchant Law are a team of highly skilled and experienced professionals who are committed to providing their clients with the highest quality legal representation possible. Whether you are a stay-at-home mother, a farmer, or anyone else in need of legal support for your divorce case, the lawyers at Merchant Law have the knowledge, expertise, and compassion to help you achieve the best possible outcome for your case. Call us for a consultation to see how we might be able to help.

 

Here are the contact details for Merchant Law’s Regina, Saskatoon, and Moose Jaw offices:

Regina:

Address: 2401 Saskatchewan Drive, Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 4H8

Phone: (306) 359-7777

 

Saskatoon:

Address:

224 4th Avenue South, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7K 5M5

Phone: (306) 653-7777

 

Moose Jaw:

Address: 1235 Main Street North, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan S6H 6M4

Phone: (306) 693-7777

 

If you need legal representation for your divorce case or any other legal matter, please don’t hesitate to contact us. Our lawyers are here to help you navigate the legal system and achieve the best possible outcome for your case.

About Donald I.M. Outerbridge

Donald became the Executive Director of Merchant Law Group LLP starting in 1993, nearly 30 years ago. His experience managing law firms at various levels and in multiple provinces across Canada goes back even further to 1981.